Using A Dehumidifier For That Humid Industrial Kitchen

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I’ve been there before, working in an industrial kitchen around all of the steam and water, it’s not the most pleasant thing on the planet. It’s extremely humid, but the food is totally worth it and seeing the look on the customers faces when they take that first bite. The same goes for your family’s kitchen, the humidity can be almost unbearable, especially during the summer. It’s important that you don’t let your kitchen get too humid, because it can cause bacteria buildup.

Keep Your Kitchen Mold-Free

Let’s talk a little bit about mold. If you have mold in your kitchen, whether at home or in your restaurant, you aren’t going to want your customers or family to know, so it’s best to get rid of it as soon as you can or take precautionary measures to prevent it. The growth of mold can contribute to poor indoor air quality and certain molds such as dry rot fungus and serpula lacrymans are extremely destructive and can completely ruin your business or home.

Mold requires moisture to grow. This moisture can come from cooking, condensation, leaks from plumbing, and more. The mold then releases spores into the air that people can’t see, but can inhale deep into the lungs and can pose a risk for respiratory issues. This is why investing in a dehumidifier, such as those recommended at Good Air Geeks, is essential to keeping your bistro or home kitchen mold-free.

What Makes A Comfortable Bistro?

When I walk into any bistro, if it’s uncomfortable, I walk right back out. You don’t want to sit down to eat in a place that’s overly humid, do you? If you own a bistro and you find customers walking out and notice it’s humid, get that dehumidifier. Another thing that I look for is cleanliness. I do not like a dirty bistro. I hate seeing crumbs on a table that a busboy/girl previously cleaned and I really don’t like a dirty bathroom. Usually, if a bathroom is dirty, it means that the kitchen where your food is being prepared is dirty as well.

One other thing that I look for is space. I’m not a huge fan of sitting in a crowded bistro. There should be ample space for you to comfortably sit without having to move your chair anytime somebody wants to walk past you. Bistros are supposed to be inviting and comfortable, a place where you can sit and have a conversation with a friend without feeling hot, overcrowded, or rushed. I can’t tell you how many of them I have walked out of because of all of those reasons.

Conclusion

The kitchen is going to be a naturally humid environment because of the steam the cooking creates. It’s best to control this steam and the humidity to avoid the creation of mold, bacteria, and other nasty particles that can make your family or customers sick. Not to mention, if black mold forms, you can have your bistro shut down until the problem is resolved, costing you tons of money in business and repairs.

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